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Boilerplate:
All opinions expressed are the author's own and do not reflect any institution or organization he may be affiliated with. Etc. Etc.
Recent Tweets @louwhiteman

mapsontheweb:

Earth’s ice and vegetation cycle over a year

mapsontheweb:

Map of the world 3000 BC to 2014 CE.

okmuht:

Each frame is every 100 years (I wanted to do it every 50, but the file was too large for GIF format). I created the GIF using this: http://geacron.com/home-en/

All in one bacon cheeseburger.

mapsontheweb:

Europe, 1919, after the First World War. The turbulent inter-war years begin.

Read More

Kurdistan on the map, and Russia with control of the Crimea.

The more things change… 

vividvivka:

… Damn.
I have no words.
RIP kiddo. Hope you found some peace.

(via wilwheaton)

(via phazes)

americasgreatoutdoors:

Many people enjoyed last night’s Supermoon on America’s public lands. Here is one of our favorites from Joshua National Park!

Photo: Brad Sutton

newsweek:

The Iraqi soldier died attempting to pull himself up over the dashboard of his truck. The flames engulfed his vehicle and incinerated his body, turning him to dusty ash and blackened bone.

In a photograph taken soon afterward, the soldier’s hand reaches out of the shattered windshield, which frames his face and chest. The colors and textures of his hand and shoulders look like those of the scorched and rusted metal around him.

Fire has destroyed most of his features, leaving behind a skeletal face, fixed in a final rictus. He stares without eyes.

On February 28, 1991, Kenneth Jarecke stood in front of the charred man, parked amid the carbonized bodies of his fellow soldiers, and photographed him. At one point, before he died this dramatic mid-retreat death, the soldier had had a name.

He’d fought in Saddam Hussein’s army and had a rank and an assignment and a unit. He might have been devoted to the dictator who sent him to occupy Kuwait and fight the Americans. Or he might have been an unlucky young man with no prospects, recruited off the streets of Baghdad. Jarecke took the picture just before a ceasefire officially ended Operation Desert Storm—the U.S.-led military action that drove Saddam Hussein and his troops out of Kuwait, which they had annexed and occupied the previous August.

The image and its anonymous subject might have come to symbolize the Gulf War. Instead, it went unpublished in the United States, not because of military obstruction but because of editorial choices.

It’s hard to calculate the consequences of a photograph’s absence. But sanitized images of warfare, The Atlantic’s Conor Friedersdorf argues, make it “easier … to accept bloodless language” such as 1991 references to “surgical strikes” or modern-day terminology like “kinetic warfare.”

The Vietnam War was notable for its catalog of chilling and iconic war photography; Some images, like Ron Haeberle’s pictures of the My Lai massacre, were initially kept from the public. But other violent images—Nick Ut’s scene of child napalm victims and Eddie Adams’s photo of a Vietcong man’s execution—won Pulitzer Prizes and had a tremendous impact on the outcome of the war.

The War Photo No One Would Publish - The Atlantic

The world isn’t being destroyed by democrats or republicans, red or blue, liberal or conservative, religious or atheist — the world is being destroyed by one side believing the other side is destroying the world. The world is being hurt and damaged by one group of people believing they’re truly better people than the others who think differently. The world officially ends when we let our beliefs conquer love. We must not let this happen.