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All opinions expressed are the author's own and do not reflect any institution or organization he may be affiliated with. Etc. Etc.
Recent Tweets @louwhiteman

booksofthought:

Canada: [Problem] —- “Sorry, eh” —-> [Solution]

Three screens, two eyes.

neworleanssaints:

New Orleans Saints 2014 Schedule. PDF: http://bit.ly/Saints2014Schedule

Only two home games over the first seven weeks.

Ugh.

Sign of the times. 

Coors Field, Denver. 

Since Easter has fallen on 4/20…

He is risen.
I, frankly, could have used a few more hours of sleep.

First step to success is showing up, isn’t that what they say? Yet it appears that is more of a challenge than one might imagine.

Thought: Perhaps we are spending too much time stressing about what our schools teach, and not enough time stressing about instilling responsibility in our kids. At some point little Johnny needs to understand failure, and more importantly fear of failure. That’s how we learn responsibility. 

theatlantic:

FX Brings Fargo (Back) To Life

“This is a true story,” announces the onscreen text. We see a snow-swept road and the headlights of a distant car. As it approaches, once-mournful strings rise to a crashing crescendo, punctuated by… sleigh bells.

I refer, of course, to Fargo. But not to Fargo, the 1996 Coen brothers film. No, I refer to Fargo, the new FX series making its debut tonight. The familiar elements are all there: the sad-sack salesman and female cop and murderous drifter; the car crash and ill-fated traffic stop and grisly murders; the semi-arctic setting and “Minnesota nice” accents offering up yahs and you betchas and fer Pete’s sakeses. But they’re scrambled into unexpected sequences and patterns. This is not a remake. It’s a remix.

The idea of making Fargo into a TV show has been around almost since the movie itself hit theaters, and it’s always seemed to me a terrible one given the idiosyncratic nature of the source material. In 1997 a pilot was even shot, though never picked up, featuring a pre-Sopranos Edie Falco in the role of Marge Gunderson, the iconic police chief played by Frances McDormand in the film. But the FX show takes a different approach from such would-be sequels, bringing back not the original characters but instead merely their types. And the result is, to my considerable surprise, very, very good.

Read more. [Image: FX]

I’ll be watching.